Thanking things for their service

Personal organizer Marie Kondo has some unique organizing advice, as summarized by Penelope Green for the New York Times:Discard everything that does not ‘spark joy,’ after thanking the objects that are getting the heave-ho for their service.” One of the symptoms of hoarding disorder is a stronger than usual emotional attachment to inanimate objects, which makes it painful to throw them out. Most people have emotional attachments to objects at some level, but instead of mocking or denigrating them as irrational, Marie Kondo acknowledges and values your emotional relationships to objects, in a way that helps you let them go instead of keeping them.

As anyone who has ever visited my apartment knows, I don’t have difficulty getting rid of things. This time I went through my closets with “thanking objects for their service” in mind and caught myself several times denigrating a formerly useful object – and my own judgement by extension – and stopped myself. I ended with 5 bags of garbage (including a dozen old bras), a cart full of things for Goodwill, and a lot of happiness about the decisions I made in 2014.

I have always been good at ending things, as even the most cursory glance at my résumé (or my love life) will tell you. What I’m getting better at now is ending things well: passing them on to new people, or winding them down gracefully if no one wants to continue them. That connects strongly to the idea of thanking objects – or your past self – for their service. I’m ending things not because they are useless or ugly or a bad idea in the first place, but because I’m ready for something new. So, here is a list of things I am ending or passing on right now:

Leading the Ada Initiative: My typical job tenure is on the order of 18 months, so it was with a sense of wonder that I realized I’m approaching 4 years in one job: Executive Director of the Ada Initiative. At the same time, I am thrilled that we are searching for a new executive director. I have really enjoyed these 4 years, especially getting to work so closely with my co-founder and friend Mary Gardiner. (If you really like someone but you live on opposite sides of an ocean, I can recommend co-founding a business with them as a way to make sure you get to spend lots of time with each other. ALL THE HEARTS to you, Mary.)

I really enjoyed building a business from the ground up, and working with people I genuinely like and respect. I’m proud of myself for working with my excellent career counselor to find out for sure that I don’t want to lead the Ada Initiative forever. By giving up the head spot, I’m giving myself time to develop new training programs in 2015 – teaching and designing the Ally Skills Workshop and Impostor Syndrome Training are my favorite parts of my job right now. In the past, I’d have had to justify quitting the ED spot by deciding that the Ada Initiative was a bad idea and I wanted nothing to do with it; now I can say it is still awesome, someone else will want this job, and I can do something slightly different and keep working with the same people and organization.

File systems consulting: I shut down my file systems consulting business at the end of 2014, after 7 years of freelance work and some really sweet file system debugging problems (my favorites: root causing bad flash by the pattern of data corruption, tracking down and fixing a deadlock in the VFS freeze/thaw code, and parallelizing fsck for ext3). I continued to consult even while I had a full-time job because (a) it pays really well, (b) I didn’t want my expertise to “go to waste,” (c) almost no other file system consultants exist because we tend to prefer steady full-time jobs that let us code happily away in a corner. In some way, it felt like I was being ungrateful to everything my file systems career had given me if I stopped consulting, but I really didn’t have the time or the interest any more. (Also, Miklos Szeredi’s overlayfs finally got integrated into mainline, so I feel like I can lay unioning file systems to rest.) So I took Marie Kondo’s advice, thanked my file systems career for what it gave me, shut down my consulting web site, and updated my LinkedIn profile. Yay!

Treasurer of Double Union: I served as treasurer of Double Union from mid-2013 to December 2014, and happily handed it over to Sally Maki last month. The job of treasurer is never “done” but it is well-documented, mostly automated, and a great thing for people to do as preparation for starting their own business. I am really happy to have been a key part of growing Double Union from a twinkle in our eyes to a 130+ member makerspace with a comfortable environment for women and a working 3D printer. I’m still on the board of directors, but hope to step down at the end of 2015 in favor of people with fresh ideas and new energy. I always envisioned Double Union as a thing I wanted to help start but not run for very long, which is maybe why stepping down as treasurer was the easiest and simplest thing to end (emotionally – in terms of work, it was hours and hours of writing documentation and setting up software and meetings with various people over more than a year).

Looking at the above list, it’s clear that a full-time job as Director of Training at the Ada Initiative won’t be enough to keep me busy for 2015. I don’t know what else I will start or take on, and I’m excited! I love learning new things, solving new problems, and growing sustainable organizations.